Edinburgh Past And Present - The Edinburgh Website

Historic Houses West

Barnton Braehead House-2010 (2)a

BRAEHEAD HOUSE – BRAEHEAD DRIVE

Built as a country house in the early 1700s it stood at the end of a long drive entered from Braehead Road. It has a late Victorian extension. The house is now surrounded by a modern housing estate and has given its name to the surrounding streets.

Barnton Easter Park House-2010 (2)a

EASTER PARK – EASTER PARK DRIVE

Built in 1905 for the tea family Melrose by architect William Reid. In later years the house belonged to the Younger family but when the last member died in 1971 the house and estate were sold to a property developer. The grounds now contain modern housing and the house itself has been converted into flats

Corstorphine Dower House-2010 (3)a

CORSTORPHINE DOWER HOUSE – ST MARGARETS PARK

Built around 1660 by one of the Lords Forrester whose family had bought the lands of Corstorphine in 1347 and built Corstorphine castle. There is no trace of the castle now except a very large doocot. The Dower House was known as Gibson lodge when owned by the Gibson family from the end of the 18th century. It now stands in St Margarets Park which was laid out in 1927. The house was badly damaged by fire in 1991 but restored and it now occupied by the Corstorphine Trust.

Corstorphine Hill House-2010 (1)a

CORSTORPHINE HILL HOUSE – CORSTORPHINE HILL

Built in 1793 this house is now known as the Mansion house and stands within Edinburgh Zoo. It was given a baronial makeover in 1891 when it was occupied by the Macmillan family. The house and the estate were sold to the Scottish Zoological Society in 1912 for £17000. The house is now available for a variety of functions including weddings.

Corstorphine House-2010 (2)a

CORSTORPHINE HOUSE – CORSTORPHINE HOUSE AVENUE

This was one of the first houses of this style to be built in Corstorphine as the village began expanding. It was built in 1832 and with a later eastern extension.

Cramond House-2010 (1)a

CRAMOND HOUSE - CRAMOND GLEBE ROAD

In the 1680s the descendants of James Inglis built Cramond House as a more modern residence than Cramond Tower. In order to build the house many old cottages had to be demolished. The frontage was added in 1778 and the back was remodelled in 1820. It is now the headquarters of Scottish Wildlife Trust but is owned by Cramond Kirk.

Cramond Tower-2010 (2)a

CRAMOND TOWER – CRAMOND GLEBE ROAD

A 15th century tower it was used for over 200 years by the Bishops of Dunkeld on their way to Inchcolm Abbey. Edinburgh Merchant James Inglis lived in the tower from 1622 until Cramond House was built. The tower was abandoned for 200 years and became a ruin slowly being destroyed by surrounding trees. In the early 1980s the tower was brought back to life by George Jamieson. A low level extension was added in the 1990s to complement the existing building

Murrayfield House-2010 (1)a

MURRAYFIELD HOUSE - MURRAYFIELD AVENUE

Built in 1735 on the site of an earlier house for an advocate Archibald Murray. The lower wing on the eastern side was added in the 1780s but the west wing was never added.. It is from this family that the area takes its name.
The house was threatened with demolition in the early 20th century in order to extend Murrayfield Avenue to the north. It was met with a huge outcry from the resident at the time so the street now curves around the house and gardens. It has been a care home for the elderly since 1991.

Murayfield Roseburn House a

ROSEBURN HOUSE- ROSEBURN STREET

Originally it was a small tower that was built in the 1500s by Mungo Russell a city treasurer. The arms of the Russells of Roseburn are over the main entrance. A two storey extension was added to the south in the 1600s. A further two storey extension was added to the east at the end of the 1600s. In the 1700s a further two storey extension was added at the east. The house has stories connecting it to both Mary Queen of Scots and Oliver Cromwell. It is very difficult to see from the street so I have put the 2 views up that you can see.